Over an ocean away…

My pal, Coleser, has recently hatched a plan for myself and a couple of other like-minded souls to go to the Sea Change festival in Totnes. He’s chosen well as he knows that of recent I’ve come to the conclusion that my days accompanying him to Green Man and End of the Road may well be over. Much too old and too soft these days. The lure of the damp sod, the open air stage and the beer tent no longer sufficient recompense for the dubious pleasures of uncomfortable nights, listening to the rain lashing the canvas and the sound of drunken oafs stumbling over guy ropes. Sea Change is a town festival, however, and as such provides simple luxuries like beds, roofs and comfy pubs. This pleases me immensely and I’m beginning to look forward to the weekend.

Headliners for Sea Change include Jane Weaver, Hookworms and the mythical Damo Suzuki. I’m also becoming quite keen to see this pair:

Group Listening

Paul Jones I do not know but he is apparently a long term, college friend of Stephen Black, whom as Sweet Baboo, I’ve followed for a while and indeed written about him, (here in fact). Over the course of a few years, I’ve seen Black playing bass behind Gruff Rhys, Euros Childs, Cate le Bon and H Hawkline more times than I care to remember (including a good few at Green Man) and also doing his own Sweet Baboo set at the Prince Albert in Stroud.

This Group Listening record that came out earlier this year is different again, though. Clarinet and Piano: Selected Works, Vol 1 sounds like the discouraging title of a John Cage or Brian Eno record, doesn’t it? Not that far off, to be honest. It is indeed a collection of ambient pieces, mostly covers, played in bewitchingly straight fashion on said clarinet and piano.

Something about this title and description made every fibre of my body scream Can’t Be Arsed when I came across it, but a little common sense and open-mindedness has yielded to me a light and beautiful treat that I could easily have missed. I am not clear how many of the tracks are originals and how many are covers, but a brief scan yields songs by Eno, Euros Childs, Dieter Roedelius and a gorgeous cover of Maryan which I really think you should hear

 

I’ve spoken before (at length) about my love of Robert Wyatt and I’m not generally keen on people piggy-backing on the great man’s genius, but here I’m willing to give them a pass. The pair manage to take a meandering, joy-filled, free-spirited original and give me something new. They constrain it a little, painting it in bluer, more directionless tones. Black talks in this interview about “a deep yearning… a positive sadness” about the interpretations and you can hear it here. Childs’ “The Dog” is another uneven triumph.

There’s also something very refreshing about dense, industrial, abstract krautrock compositions transcribed into lighter, more human tones by Jones and Black. You hear this very clearly in the Eno track, “Julie With”, not a song I knew previously. There’s a beautiful video released to go with it too, all bridges and channels, mundane blues and greys:

 

The richness of a slow summer…

They Gots Beef

Emusic’s been down for a couple of days (cue furious ranting from folk on the message board and a general fear that this Blog’s music provider of choice has finally gone under – it’s going to happen one day…) but this has meant that I’ve not recently bought anything much new. In fact, I’ve been forced to fall back on the sparse resources I’ve built up over a mere 40 years of obsessive music procurement.

This has actually been fun – I’ve been dousing myself liberally in Pere Ubu, the TV Personalities and the splendid brilliance of the Soft Boys (Underwater Moonlight, is definitively in my Top Five) – and has synched neatly with my reading Peter Hook’s book about his time in Joy Division. I’ve therefore had a perversely miserable time this week re-acquainting myself with Unknown Pleasures.

I couldn’t help but be struck by how much the record fitted in perfectly with so many of today’s indie-releases but at the same time felt like opening a musty, monochrome time-capsule from my teen years – even as a middle-class lad growing up in the West, it still evokes the smell of municipal gloom and crumbling warehouses which it’s easy to forget existed in the seventies and eighties (Gloucester Docks anyone?). What times…

Impossible to conceive of this group of dayglo ninnies in times like those.

The Evil Usses

I think I mentioned the Evil Usses before, in my Here Lies Man post, with rash undertakings to return to them Very Soon. If you were hanging on, eagerly awaiting the promised lines, well, I commend you for your youthful optimism and maybe this post will afford you a few more days of wide-eyed hopefulness…

Yes, so Bristol’s Evil Usses supported Here Lies Man on a cold Sunday afternoon in March, the original Friday evening date having been suspended because of heavy snowfalls. Very odd to be walking into a pub of a Sunday afternoon with all the familiar anticipation that a dose of live music still gives this old chap, and as myself and Coleser did so, the slightly surreal feeling was hardly alleviated by the absolute racket coming from the stage area.

Evil Usses had already started and were lumbering and honking through a truly bizarre set of “rocky notjazz, jazzy notrock” that confused and amused by turns. The Evil Usses are a sax/synth-guitar-bass-drums four-piece with clear Beefheart / Zappa love and an ear for squelchy disruption.

Watch this…

 

 

(As was pointed out, you know it’s left-field when even Big Jeff loses the thread)

There were no vocals and nothing lyrical about them at all, just a dollop of saucy smart-aleckery played at enthusiastic volume and a determination to play at at least one step’s divorce from anything else you’re going to hear this week. I should qualify the Beefheart thing, though – they’re a swinging version, more like a post-funk Magic Band (and I’m not talking about the Captain’s own rather creepy, insecure attempts to make a seventies “pop” record). It was enormous fun and left me grinning foolishly to myself until Here Lies Man came on and did their thing.

Despite Coleser’s prudent counsel (I have “form” in this area…), I snuck off to the merch stall and bought what turns out to be the second Evil Usses record, Amateur Pro Wrestling, and I’m glad I did – it’s not quite as exhilaratingly daft as that afternoon’s set, but certainly a fun listen. Turns out their eponymous debut and their just-released third, Muck, are both available on the newly restored Emusic (the latter characteristically mislabelled) and I’ve just spent a blissful Sunday afternoon immersed in their goofy genius…

I also have a couple of recordings from the set, which I’d like to think capture some of anarchic enthusiasm of the afternoon.

Buzz Gots Beef

Grouse

Wellard J Fowler

You’d also be well advised to pay a visit to the band’s Soundcloud page which is full to bursting with tracks and outtakes.

Ridiculous…

I was there in the room…

the-hecks-mirror-by-dan-paz-smallerMeant to follow up the last Trouble in Mind a little quicker than this, but hey-ho…

If the Beef Jerk offering somehow wasn’t lo-fi or strident enough for you, may I suggest the shriller, twangier and even more brilliantly-named the Hecks, also on Trouble in Mind, also young ‘n’ feisty and also hogging my car stereo.

Oh, and they’re really, bloody noisy.

The Hecks

The Hecks are a three-piece from Chicago, who are obsessed with strange guitar tunings, “intentionality” and Faust. The “intentionality” thing is an idea I’ve lifted from an interview they did with Chicago magazine LocalLoop, which I think translates as everything that comes out of the studio being done with and for a purpose. Do read the interview, their idea of guitar tuned in a particular way having to stay as they are, due to financial or technical limitations, is quite a fun one.

What’s particularly odd about all this is that one of the first impressions September’s debut album gives you is of raggedness and above all chance. Very little sounds as if it has been planned, polished or preserved.

You can stream a load of Hecks songs from the TiM SoundCloud page, and I’d recommend a good listen. Particularly fond of this:

 

 

From the first taut chords of “Sugar” to the awkward zeal of closer “Airport Run”, it’s a pretty uneven affair – whirling, clanking, twanging chords rub tattooed shoulders with drone and feedback-decked noise. It’s rough, Faustian stuff and, as I say, really noisy. I reckon, there’s always a place for dissonance, ugliness and a right bloody racquet.

And for those times, I give you…

Let’s move into the ocean, we won’t tell anybody…

beef-jerkThese days I oft times find myself haphazardly using up the last few of my eMusic downloads at the end of the month. It can be a slightly edgy, weirdly cautious business (I hate wasting things) and often culminates in my snagging another Latin collection of eager garage punk or (more often than you’d imagine) some murky new Soft Machine live set.

Well this month, I stumbled upon a new tack that I’ll employ more often. I chose at random one of my favourite labels of recent years – Trouble in Mind – and just go for it. A bit of rummaging around amongst the releases there and jackpot…

Beef Jerk

Beef Jerk are Australian and are part of the, er, burgeoning “dolewave” scene there (yes, really). And, in spite of my proverbial goldfish-like span of attention, have had the run of the car stereo for much of the week. Their debut record, Tragic, is a collection of demos that had been knocking around on the Internet for a couple of years before they decided to spruce them up and self-release them officially. TiM stepped in from there and have given it a proper release so that the inquisitive punters of the globe can get busy.

It’s a great little batch of fifteen songs that starts off promisingly (“Why are you so disagreeable? Table manners? Unbelievable”) and really kicks on from there. It’s absolutely packed full of loopy, jangly chords, dry lyrics, a few profanities and the odd sprinkling of Beefheart-ian rough sax. The songs do touch on a fair amount of everyday slacker business – caravan parks, shoplifting, drinking and general loafing round – but also take in mysterious Frenchmen, doomed fathers and flights to the seabed (“don’t forget the sunscreen lotion / fish fingers in the sun”).

I’m clearly not a musician and can only scratch my head and applaud songwriters Jack Lee and Mikey Branson’s ability to choose the right chords each time. I’m also very much impressed by the former’s prodigious ability to sing out of tune, and although press reviews frequently mention the Go-Betweens, I’d say Beef Jerk are more like another batch of Mark E Smith’s children (alright, grandchildren).

There’s not a lot of Beef Jerk around on the Internet (yet?), which could of course mean a couple of things, but I’m going to take the getting-in-at-the-ground-floor line. Fairly recently, you could actually stream the whole of the record from the band’s Bandcamp page, but until that returns (as they claim it will), you’ll have to trawl through the demos on Soundcloud or get a few tasters from YouTube.

This one’s my favourite:

 

(Particularly gratifying to see the pickup driver put the bin back up at the end, nice lads really…)

But this is also a great surging bugger of a song:

De la vida, en el barrio

ana-tijoux685x250

 

{Oh, and now I’ve just done the Mujeres, I see that this post that I wrote about a week ago, never got published. It belongs before the Mujeres post, but I’m not sure how to arrange this. Can we just imagine?}

 

Been relatively busy recently and truth be told not listening to a lot of music. Another trip around Spain beckons and consequently a lot of ear time has gone on trying to scrub up my language. With predictably mixed results…

I have, however, done some Spanish music listening this week and instead of filling the iPod with Spanish versions of what I generally listen to (garage, indie, psych – although all this is coming, trust me…), I thought I’d dip my toes into something a bit more exotic, a bit more authentically Latino. Tried a bit of cumbia and some spanking up-to-date nu cumbia records from the ZZK and Nacional labels, but eventually settled on some Latin hip-hop.

Ana Tijoux

This first track is from Chilean hip-hop artist, Ana Tijoux, whose album Vengo I went through with no little gusto all of yesterday whilst out and about during the day. The record, apparently, won her a Grammy award last year, so I’m not what you’d call ahead of the curve here, but still… In truth, there’s a little too much slushy jazz-funk in some of the record for my liking but the first four tracks, including the title track and this one, here, are absolute belters…

As yet, I know nothing about the second rapper, Shadia Mansour, whose feisty counterpoint to Tijoux’s own animated style is something of an eye-popper.

Tijoux is actually from France, her parents having been exiled during Pinochet’s reign in Chile, but has now settled in Santiago. One of the features of Vengo is apparently its gallant attempt to rescue native Andean instruments from the realm of the ubiquitous World Music collection and the street busker.

Then I also came across this…

Hijo de la Cumbia & Alika

I’ve also bought the debut record by Argentinean DJ and producer Hijo de la Cumbia, which is apparently set to be a Nu Cumbia stone-cold classic and it’s quite intriguing.  But to be honest, this is the stand-out track on it…

It’s bought to life by the oomph of gutsy Uruguayan vocalist Alika. As with the previous offerings, I can catch precious little of the words. I could look them up or get Google to sort them for me but, to be honest, I prefer the not knowing, it’s all about the hormones, I feel…

I’m pretty certain this is not, as it claims, the “official video” but, again, never mind the quality, feel the width…

Yeah, heard a funny thing…

furguson-2A last couple of Spanish treats before my butterfly senses move onto some other pretty flower…

Mujeres are a garage band from Barcelona who also run a record shop in the city, Luchadores, which I believe I stumbled upon last time I was there (fine place too..) They do a great line in all your psych-y garage standards – by now, you know the sort of stuff that gets you a mention on these pages: surf-y guitars, tambourines, wigged out guitar breaks – and have a number of records around (on eMusic, certainly).

Have a look:

 

The Soft Gems record is a great one, rough-hewn and rugged in all the right places – I’m not quite up to speed on all their other records – there’s a muddled collection of releases and re-releases that I’m confused by – but some of their more recent releases show a slightly disappointing desire to mature a little. I prefer them immature, of course, and at their most infantile they’re a truly monstrous unit.

Watch this live performance at 2012’s Primavera Sound:

 

This track is called “Salvaje”, which is also the name of a song by Peru’s magnificent Los Saicos. It’s a different track, again from Soft Gems, but Mujeres were actually the band backing Erwin Flores in the Madrid video I posted previously. There’s a good interview with them here in English and whilst writing this, I’ve just noticed that their first demo CD is now available gratis, here, at their Bandcamp page.

What’re you waiting for? The kids are loving it!

The other thing I’m tossing carelessly your way is, I’m afraid, not a video, and may well lose me the scanty readership I already have. I should by rights hate this (I’m sure many will) but try as I might, I just can’t… In fact, it’s not quite the pappy massacre you might be tempted to think it is

I give you the great Chicha Libre…

 

[There is, btw, a version by Sarah Brightman, if you really want to see poor old Arthur squirm… I’m not giving you a link for it…]

I’d do it all again for another crack at the hit parade. Oh what do you think?

wreckless-eric-650x400Lawks-a-mussy! A new record by this old rascal…

Such is the lack of interest in Wreckless Eric these days that I quite literally know not a single person who is likely to care in the slightest about a new Eric Goulden long player. But since I became aware in the nineties of his irregular trickle of eccentric and rather uneven albums, he’s become a bit of a furtive pleasure of mine.

Wreckless Eric

I think I wrote a while back about the Hitsville Houseband, but another favourite of mine was the 2008 joint release with wife Amy Rigby, all the old battered and kicked-about charm of old still very much to the fore. A post-punk version of the Johnny & June / Gram & Emmylou thing, if you will, all seen through the eyes of Tom Waits.

I was going to look for a YouTube clip from that record but came across something much better:

 

Wreckless Eric. The Flamin’ Groovies. What’s not to like?

Amy Rigby plays on the new record too, but AmERICa is more of a Wreckless Eric release than their previous joint release. I’ve only just bought it and given it a couple of listens today, but it’s going to be a lovely record. I’m already enjoying it.

And you can too! Yes, the whole thing is available for live streaming on his Bandcamp page. And if I can get it right…

 

He’s even touring now… Maybe it’s finally Eric’s time!

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